Tag Archives: American History

1776: FOURTH OF JULY MUSICAL

1776-musical-movieIt may be my fondness for mythology that makes me love to watch particular movies around particular holidays.  I say that because many of the well- known myths were recited on ancient holidays when their subject matter was relevant to those holidays. The stories helped accentuate the meaning of the special events and that’s the way I use various movies.

At Christmas I watch countless variations of A Christmas Carol, around Labor Day I watch Eight Men Out, at Halloween The Evil Dead and the original Nightmare On Elm Street, Thanksgiving Eve I do Oliver! and for Frontierado (which is just a month away now) I do Silverado.

Since the actual 4th of July is loaded with activity I always show 1776 on the night before. It’s a great way to get in the mood for Independence Day. It’s a musical but with brilliant dialogue portions and the story involves the political maneuvering  surrounding the Original Thirteen Colonies at last announcing their independence from Great Britain, more than a year after  the shots fired at Lexington and Concord started the war.

The story is excellently conveyed and is moving, comical, invigorating and poignant all at once. As long as you know which parts of the tale are depicted accurately and which are complete b.s. it’s a terrific way to spend each 3rd of July. Continue reading

Advertisements

2 Comments

Filed under Revolutionary War

FORT GRISWOLD: THE ALAMO OF THE REVOLUTIONARY WAR

With the 4th of July fast approaching here’s another seasonal post from Balladeer’s Blog. This action was also called the Battle of Groton Heights.  

William LedyardFORT GRISWOLD – Fort Griswold was an American fortess on Groton Heights in Connecticut overlooking the Thames River. On September 6th, 1781 the American traitor General Benedict Arnold and his British troops raided Groton and burned New London while battling the massively outnumbered Rebel troops in the fort. 

Lieutenant General Sir Henry Clinton had sent General Arnold to raid and seize ships in Connecticut and to determine if the former colony was ripe for occupation by British forces. The spirited defense of Fort Griswold permitted multiple American ships to escape the attacking Red Coats and nipped in the bud Clinton’s plans for occupying Connecticut. 

Benedict Arnold led at least 1,700 British regulars in the battle. Fort Griswold was defended by a mere 150 American Militiamen under the command of Lieutenant Colonel William Ledyard.  Continue reading

Leave a comment

Filed under Neglected History, Revolutionary War

DEMOCRAT ATROCITY ROUNDUP: FEBRUARY 28th

Because it is ALWAYS fun to puncture the pomposity of Democrat asses who think that only Republican asses are disgusting:   

Obama Derp*** ANOTHER OBAMA CROOK PLEADS GUILTY – In what seems like the 999,897,789th scandal from what Obama and the Democrat media try to pretend was his “scandal-free” (LMAO) administration, YET ANOTHER Obama Gang Soldier goes down.

Raphael A Sanchez, Obama’s top attorney for I.C.E. in Seattle, has pleaded guilty to wire fraud and aggravated identity theft. Sanchez proved that Democrats – especially from the Obama Administration – never run out of ways of exploiting the illegal immigration problem. Sanchez admitted forging documents with info obtained through his access to I.C.E. resources and used those documents for stealing identities to open credit card and bank accounts.

I guess Obama’s motto was really “Yes we CAN exploit illegal immigrants for more than just vote fraud!” You can find more on the Sanchez story wherever you like. But seriously, though, “The Sanchez Method” may be the wave of the future in Democrat Fund Raising Efforts!

Democrat slogan*** AND SPEAKING OF VOTE FRAUD, the Best Friend of Democrat Politicians everywhere, around ONE HUNDRED THOUSAND MORE non-citizens have been found on the voter rolls, this time in Pennsylvania. Talk about “election interference!”

Funny how it’s only Democrats who keep saying this is not an issue that should be pursued.     Continue reading

Leave a comment

Filed under LIBERALS AND CONSERVATIVES, Neglected History, opinion

SIXTEEN OVERLOOKED SECRETARIES OF STATE

With Presidents Day coming up on the 19th Balladeer’s Blog has been presenting some seasonal posts. A fair amount of our past presidents had served as Secretary of State in earlier administrations so that is the tie-in to the upcoming holiday. 

Timothy Pickering1. TIMOTHY PICKERING (1795-1800)

Served under: Presidents George Washington and John Adams

Noted for: Conspiring with Alexander Hamilton to undermine some of the policies of the Washington and Adams administrations. When Adams discovered this he ordered Pickering to resign, but Pickering refused, forcing Adams to fire him. Pickering remains the only Secretary of State to officially be fired by the President.

2. HENRY CLAY (1825-1829)

Served under: President John Quincy Adams

Noted for: Fighting a duel with Senator John Randolph, one of Clay’s critics who felt he had struck a “corrupt bargain” with Adams to get this prized cabinet position. Also for completing the first commerce treaties between the young United States and the various nations in Scandinavia and Latin America.

3. JOHN FORSYTH (1834-1841)

Served under: Presidents Andrew Jackson and Martin Van Buren

Noted for: Obtaining long-disputed reparations from France for U.S. commercial losses suffered during the Napoleonic Wars. Also for threatening to resign early in Van Buren’s administration before his relationship with the new president improved.

Daniel Webster4. DANIEL WEBSTER (1841-1843 and 1850-1852)

Served under: Presidents William Henry Harrison, John Tyler and Millard Filmore

Noted for: Negotiating a treaty which set the boundaries between Maine and New Brunswick, encouraging a popular uprising in Hungary and for dying in office in 1852. But mostly for his distinguished Senate career and for his fictional role in the story The Devil and Daniel Webster.

5. WILLIAM MARCY (1853-1857) Continue reading

2 Comments

Filed under Neglected History

THE TEXAS NAVY: NEGLECTED MILITARY UNIT

Texas NavyThe Memorial Day Holiday is marked here at Balladeer’s Blog with items about neglected conflicts and neglected military units from American history. The latest unit to be examined is the Navy of the Republic of Texas. I’ll examine the period from the Texas Revolution against the tyrannical Mexican government up through the Texas Republic joining the U.S. as the State of Texas.

During the Fall Season of 1835 Texas rebelled against Mexico’s despotism and in March of 1836 officially declared their independence. On September 1st, 1835 two Texas ships – the San Felipe and Laura – clashed with the Mexican vessel Correo de Mejico. Maritime fallout from the incident severely limited Mexico’s efforts to prevent the rebellious Texans from importing arms and supplies for the conflict.

By November of 1835 the Texas government established an official navy to serve at sea and along the Rio Grande. Commodore Charles E Hawkins was in command. During the Texas Revolution their navy prevented the Mexican Navy from establishing a blockade of the new Republic’s coast and its port cities. Those naval forces simultaneously raided Mexican merchant ships, plundering supplies for the Texan land forces.  Continue reading

10 Comments

Filed under Neglected History

MEDAL OF HONOR WINNERS FOR THE 1871 KOREAN EXPEDITION

Medal of HonorTHE THREE-DAY MEMORIAL DAY WEEKEND IS HERE! As always Balladeer’s Blog marks the event with a few looks at neglected conflicts from America’s past. The servicemen who fought in those actions are just as deserving of being memorialized as those who fought in more familiar wars.  

KOREAN EXPEDITION OF 1871 – A Diplomatic Mission was sent to Korea that year, with the time period’s usual military escort of war ships on such ventures. The U.S. expedition was snubbed on the diplomatic side and then Korean shore batteries opened fire upon the military escort. The Americans launched reprisal raids for a few days then departed, leaving U.S. – Korean relations somewhat cold for years afterward. Medal of Honor Winners:

William F LukesWILLIAM F LUKES

Navy Rank: Landsman 

Citation: June 9th – 10th, 1871 – During the assault on the Han River Forts on Ganghwa Island, Lukes came to the assistance of injured Lieutenant Hugh McKee. The Landsman fought his way through heavy resistance to the fallen McKee’s location and refused to abandon his comrade.

Through swordplay, bayonet charges and hand-to-hand combat William received a severe sword cut to the head, a wound which would cause him to suffer convulsions for the rest of his life from the brain damage. When American reinforcements arrived they found the unconscious Lukes had suffered 18 bayonet wounds in the fighting.    Continue reading

2 Comments

Filed under Neglected History

WORLD WAR ONE: DIFFERENCES WITH WORLD WAR TWO

Since we are marking the 100 year anniversary of America’s entry into World War One here is Balladeer’s Blog’s handy guide to some differences and key players between that conflict and World War Two.

American Dough Boys WW I – Lasted from 1914 to 1918  *** WW II – Lasted from 1939 to 1945 

WW I – America entered the war in April, 1917 *** WW II – America entered the war in December, 1941

WW I – Italy and Japan fought on the side of the Allied Powers *** WW II – Italy and Japan fought on the side of the Axis Powers

WW I – Germany, under Kaiser Wilhelm, led the Central Powers *** WW II- Germany, under Adolf Hitler, led the Axis Powers

WW I – Sinking of the Lusitania *** WW II – Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor

WW I – The Allied disaster at Gallipoli *** WW II – The Allied disaster Operation: Market Garden

gallipoliWW I – Douglas MacArthur is an American Commander in charge of the Rainbow Division in Europe *** WW II – Douglas MacArthur is Commander in Chief of the entire Pacific Theater of Operations

WW I – George S Patton is an American Cavalry Officer who eventually becomes a tank commander *** WW II – George S Patton is an American Army commander leading troops in North Africa, Italy and France Continue reading

2 Comments

Filed under Neglected History