Tag Archives: Philippine mythology

BAYBAYAN: EPIC MYTH OF THE PHILIPPINES

Philippines Map 3Here’s another piece in the tradition of Balladeer’s Blog’s guides to my examinations of the epic myths about Nayanazgeni, the Navajo War God and Pele & Hi’iaka, the Hawaiian volcano goddess and her sister.

I. PART ONE – After Baybayan’s miraculous birth and rapid growth the demigod travels the Philippines performing miracles and gathering a huge band of followers around him. Soon, the day of apocalyptic danger arrives. CLICK HERE   

II. PART TWO – As Baybayan performs a multitude of wedding ceremonies for his disciples all the merriment ends with the arrival of the gigantic, world-destroying monster called the Makadingding. CLICK HERE   Continue reading

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BAYBAYAN: PHILIPPINE EPIC MYTH – THE CONCLUSION

Balladeer’s Blog concludes its examination of this epic myth of the Bukidnon people of the Philippines.

PART EIGHT

Bukidnon mapAlisngaran, the favorite disciple of Baybayan, stood beside the woman he loved and continued wielding his kampilan sword against the trio of attacking giants. Whenever his kampilan – so heavy no other mortal man could lift it – sliced off the head or one of the limbs of the giants the other two would intensify their attack until the head or limb of the third could grow back. 

Meanwhile, on board the flying ship the Salimbal the demigod Baybayan, whose divine senses could see what was transpiring back on the Earth, again caused a mental image of himself to appear to Alisngaran and his beloved. (The names of many of the women in Philippine myths are unknown because their “holy men” considered the names too sacred to share with outsiders.) 

Baybayan pleaded with his favorite follower to abandon his battle with the giants and join the rest of his hundreds of surviving disciples on the trip to Skyland, the home of the gods. Alisngaran complied, grabbing his woman with one arm as Baybayan tried levitating the couple upward toward the faraway Salimbal. The weight of Alisngaran’s mighty kampilan prevented the pair from rising very far, however. Continue reading

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BAYBAYAN: PHILIPPINE EPIC MYTH PART SEVEN

Balladeer’s Blog continues its examination of this epic myth of the Bukidnon people of the Philippines.

PART SEVEN

Philippines Map 3With the menace of the giants and the dragons now behind them, Baybayan and his hundreds of surviving followers continued their journey toward Skyland, the home of the gods. The ship transporting them was the Salimbal, the divine craft sent down by the supreme deity Magbabaya.

The demigod Baybayan was looking back at the faraway Earth by way of his godly senses. He noticed the granary that his industrious disciples had filled with rice and did not want the precious food to go to waste.

Selecting a pair of the saliyao bells that lined the Salimbal, Baybayan threw them back to the Earth, transforming them into the very first male and female Maya bird. These birds and their young would feed on the rice in the granary. Since that day Maya birds have fed on rice from Philippine rice fields. (Until 1995 Maya birds were even the National Bird of the Philippines.) Suddenly danger reared its head.   Continue reading

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BAYBAYAN: PHILIPPINE EPIC MYTH PART SIX

Balladeer’s Blog continues its examination of this epic myth of the Bukidnon people of the Philippines.

PART SIX

Modern-day view from the top of Mt Palaopao, created by Baybayan in this chapter.

Modern-day view from the top of Mt Palaopao, created by Baybayan in this chapter.

The divine ship called the Salimbal rose ever higher, bearing the demigod Baybayan and his hundreds of surviving followers toward Skyland, the home of the gods.

Eventually the craft entered the realm of the giants, three-eyed man-eating beasts with upturned lips. The giants shook the Salimbal and tried to reach their greedy hands through the windows but the kampilan and balarao swords that hung above those windows as if on hinges came to life and sliced off any hands that were thrust into the divine ship. 

Soon the giants were all left behind, howling in pain because of their amputated hands. From there the Salimbal journeyed on to the realm of the dragons, who emerged from the clouds within which they lived to attack the ship and the pilgrims inside. Continue reading

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BAYBAYAN: PHILIPPINE EPIC MYTH PART FIVE

Balladeer’s Blog continues its examination of this epic myth of the Bukidnon people of the Philippines.

PART FIVE

Philippines Baybayan 2The massive craft called the Salimbal at last arrived and landed on the mountaintop where Baybayan and his hundreds of surviving followers had gathered. The bells which had signaled its approach were saliyao bells, the same bells worn by Philippine dancers on their ankles and neck. 

Music from the Salimbal filled the air and sprites from the Skyland home of the gods hovered around the ship sent down by the supreme deity Magbabaya. The craft shone even more brightly than the sun itself and could be seen for miles around.

One by one Baybayan invited his disciples to approach the entranceway to the divine craft. Two kampilan swords hung above that doorway and as each of the pilgrims sought entrance to the Salimbal the swords remained motionless for the truly pure of spirit. When any disciples who were judged unfit to reach Skyland tried to enter the craft the kampilans would turn on their hilts like on hinges and slice that would-be passenger in two.   Continue reading

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BAYBAYAN: PHILIPPINE EPIC MYTH PART FOUR

Balladeer’s Blog continues its examination of this epic myth of the Bukidnon people of the Philippines.

PART FOUR

Philippine IslandsThe demigod Baybayan led his hundreds of followers up the mountain atop which would land the Salimbal – the divine craft sent down from Skyland by the supreme deity Magbabaya. The Earthly realm, in its fundamental evil, made a concentrated effort to lure Baybayan’s followers away from their quest. The impure world sought to prevent as many of the demigod’s followers as possible from reaching the land of the gods.

First all the rocks then the very ground itself turned to gold, to tempt the followers into staying behind to collect the gold and live the comfortable and pleasant life of the wealthy. Some of Baybayan’s disciples yielded to this temptation and stayed behind to accumulate wealth. Vile nature intensified its attack as even the leaves on the trees and the grass turned to gold in order to tempt away a few more of the disciples. Continue reading

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BAYBAYAN: PHILIPPINE EPIC MYTH PART THREE

Balladeer’s Blog continues its examination of this epic myth of the Bukidnon people of the Philippines.

PART THREE

MindanaoWith Alisngaran’s wedding to his beloved postponed by the rising of the dual suns and the arrival of the mountain- sized boar called the Makadingding, that most valued disciple of the demigod Baybayan was filled with sorrow. Other couples among Baybayan’s hundreds of disciples had gotten married already. Baybayan assured Alisngaran that he and his woman could get married once arrived in Skyland, the home of the gods, but the loving couple were still despondent. 

Alisngaran and his intended bride announced they would rather stay on Earth among the unblessed rather than risk getting separated or getting killed unwed in the dangerous journey to Skyland. Baybayan was saddened by this but he agreed to let them stay behind and exempted Alisngaran from any further actions on his behalf.

Meanwhile the Makadingding was still running amok and killing everything in its path. With Alisngaran “retired” that left twelve remaining members of Baybayan’s inner circle of disciples. He sent that dozen into action, pitting their spears and kampilan swords against the enormous boar. As the battle raged three of them wound up getting devoured by the creature and three more were killed by the Makadingding’s tusks, tail and spiny quills.    Continue reading

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