Tag Archives: George Lucas

“VIRGIN” BIRTHS IN WORLD MYTHOLOGY

anakin-skywalkerOkay, I hate to go on record defending George “Jar Jar” Lucas of all people but there is one criticism directed at him that I think is unfair. People often accuse Lucas of jamming in a Jesus parallel with the way Shmee Skywalker gave birth to Anakin without any actual father being involved in the process.  

The Christian myth about Jesus’ supposed Virgin Birth is far from the only example of fatherless births in global belief systems. George Lucas was simply keeping Anakin’s story in line with demigod and hero tales from countless other cultures. The concept is not limited to Christian beliefs.

In the tradition of Balladeer’s Blog’s examination of various dead-and-resurrected gods from around the world here is a look at just a few of the mythological entities with births that either downplay the father’s role or omit it entirely.  

huitzilopochtliHUITZILOPOCHTLI

Pantheon: Aztec  

Birth: Coatlicue, the mother of this national god of the Aztecs was impregnated by a small bundle of dust or feathers that got caught in her vagina.

Her husband Mixcoatl and their other children didn’t buy that story for a minute and suspected Coatlicue of infidelity. Huitzilopochtli sprang fully-grown from his mother’s womb to protect her.  

FOR MORE AZTEC GODS CLICK HERE Continue reading

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THE ORIGINAL DJANGO MOVIES

FRONTIERADO IS COMING AUGUST 7th!

The best Django, Franco Nero, played the gunslinger in Django, Django Strikes Again and (wink) Django’s Grand Return

Like Tarzan, James Bond and Sherlock Holmes the melancholy bounty hunter Django has been presented in various incarnations and with wildly differing continuity. And like soccer the Django movies have been an enormous success almost everywhere except the U.S. 

The great Franco Nero created the role in 1966 in a film so popular in Europe (but banned in the UK for its still- controversial violence) that it spawned a legion of sequels. Some sequels starred Franco Nero or others in the role of Django, while others were just unrelated westerns whose distributors simply  attached a phony Django title to them, sometimes redoing the dubbing to have the lead character referred to as Django, other times not bothering.

Original Django poster Balladeer’s Blog helpfully presents a synopsis of the films featuring (legitimately or not) the most durable Eurowestern hero of them all. And, yes, if you’re wondering, the western bounty hunter Django was indeed the reason George Lucas named that outer space bounty hunter Jango Fett.

DJANGO (1966) – In 1867 Mexico Django, a veteran of the Union army in the Civil War, seeks revenge on Major Jackson, the Confederate officer behind his wife’s death. Jackson and his still-loyal troops, now turned  outright Klansmen, are, like so many other fleeing Confederates, fighting for the Mexican Emperor Maximillian in the war to keep his throne.   Django battles Jackson’s hooded thugs, even ambushing dozens with the Gatling Gun he keeps concealed in a coffin. When he’s out of men Major Jackson calls on Maximillian’s Imperial troopers for reinforcements and prepares to face Django and the Mexican rebel troops he’s fallen in with. For a detailed review of this unforgettable film click here: https://glitternight.com/2012/08/08/the-original-django-and-two-blaxploitation-westerns-a-primer-for-django-unchained/

DJANGO SHOOTS FIRST (1966) – AKA He Who Shoots First. Django comes into an enormous inheritance from his murdered father, an inheritance he learns he must share with his late father’s unscrupulous business partner, Mr Cluster. Django starts blowing away a host of bad guys as he tries to piece together who is responsible for his father’s death.

DJANGO, A BULLET FOR YOU (1966) – Django uses his guns to protect a group of downtrodden farmers from the villainous, land-grabbing town boss of Wagon Valley. He Continue reading

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Filed under Spaghetti Westerns

DJANGO THEATER: A LOOK AT THE FILMS OF THE MOST DURABLE SPAGHETTI WESTERN GUNSLINGER

The best Django, Franco Nero, played the gunslinger in Django, Django Strikes Again and (wink) Django’s Grand Return

Like Tarzan, James Bond and Sherlock Holmes the melancholy bounty hunter Django has been presented in various incarnations and with wildly differing continuity. And like soccer the Django movies have been an enormous success almost everywhere except the U.S. The gunman’s most recent iteration will be as an African American in Django Unchained, Quentin Tarantino’s upcoming reboot of the Spaghetti Western hero’s saga.

The great Franco Nero created the role in 1966 in a film so popular in Europe (but banned in the UK for its still- controversial violence) that it spawned a legion of sequels. Some sequels starred Franco Nero or others in the role of Django, while others were just unrelated westerns whose distributors simply  attached a phony Django title to them, sometimes redoing the dubbing to have the lead character referred to as Django, other times not bothering.

Original Django poster In anticipation of the mad rush for the various Django films that will presumably follow the release of the Tarantino reboot with Jamie Foxx Balladeer’s Blog helpfully presents a synopsis of the films featuring (legitimately or not) the most durable Eurowestern hero of them all. And, yes, if you’re wondering, the western bounty hunter Django was indeed the reason George Lucas named that outer space bounty hunter Jango Fett.

DJANGO (1966) – In 1867 Mexico Django, a veteran of the Union army in the Civil War, seeks revenge on Major Jackson, the Confederate officer behind his wife’s death. Jackson and his still-loyal troops, now turned  outright Klansmen, are, like so many other fleeing Confederates,  fighting for the Mexican Emperor Maximillian in the war to keep his throne.   Django battles Jackson’s hooded thugs, even ambushing dozens with the Gatling Gun he keeps concealed in a coffin. When he’s out of men Major Jackson calls on Maximillian’s Imperial troopers for reinforcements and prepares to face Django and the Mexican rebel troops he’s fallen in with. For a detailed review of this unforgettable film click here: https://glitternight.com/2012/08/08/the-original-django-and-two-blaxploitation-westerns-a-primer-for-django-unchained/

DJANGO SHOOTS FIRST (1966) – AKA He Who Shoots First. Django comes into an enormous inheritance from his murdered father, an inheritance he learns he must share with his late father’s unscrupulous business partner, Mr Cluster. Django starts blowing away a host of bad guys as he tries to piece together who is responsible for his father’s death.

DJANGO, A BULLET FOR YOU (1966) – Django uses his guns to protect a group of downtrodden farmers from the villainous, land-grabbing town boss of Wagon Valley. He Continue reading

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SPECIAL GUEST COMMENTATOR KARA LAIRD REVIEWS THE STAR WARS HOLIDAY SPECIAL (1978)

“The Force is strong with this one.”

This adorable little girl who could charm a Bantha into submission is Kara Laird. Her parents are Brian Laird (Official Balladeer’s Blog Nickname: The Techno-Baron) and Rachel Laird (Official Balladeer’s Blog Nickname: Jedi Mom) who is a coworker of mine when she’s not performing in her one-woman show Buckner! (Yes, she’s a Red Sox fan) Rachel is a huge fan of the original Star Wars trilogy and is passing her enthusiasm on to her daughter. Kara has such Force-Sensitivity in fact, that she’s able to review the steaming pile of diaper-sauce that IS 1978’s telefilm called The Star Wars Holiday Special. Well, like Yoda said “Size matters not”, so let me turn you over to “the littlest critic”, Kara.

KARA: Hello, kittens! In my brief stay so far in this plane of existence I’ve picked up quite a bit about you people’s pop culture and I felt I could bring some fresh perspective to George Lucas’ fall to the Dark Side. Many Star Wars fans seem to feel that Lucas AKA Darth EdWoodLite began his fall with the first film in the prequel trilogy, The Phantom Menace. Actually, however, there were plenty of clues before then that George wasn’t all he was cracked up to be. Even in the original Star Wars movie let me remind you Continue reading

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