MEDAL OF HONOR WINNERS FOR THE 1871 KOREAN EXPEDITION

Medal of HonorTHE THREE-DAY MEMORIAL DAY WEEKEND IS HERE! As always Balladeer’s Blog marks the event with a few looks at neglected conflicts from America’s past. The servicemen who fought in those actions are just as deserving of being memorialized as those who fought in more familiar wars.  

KOREAN EXPEDITION OF 1871 – A Diplomatic Mission was sent to Korea that year, with the time period’s usual military escort of war ships on such ventures. The U.S. expedition was snubbed on the diplomatic side and then Korean shore batteries opened fire upon the military escort. The Americans launched reprisal raids for a few days then departed, leaving U.S. – Korean relations somewhat cold for years afterward. Medal of Honor Winners:

William F LukesWILLIAM F LUKES

Navy Rank: Landsman 

Citation: June 9th – 10th, 1871 – During the assault on the Han River Forts on Ganghwa Island, Lukes came to the assistance of injured Lieutenant Hugh McKee. The Landsman fought his way through heavy resistance to the fallen McKee’s location and refused to abandon his comrade.

Through swordplay, bayonet charges and hand-to-hand combat William received a severe sword cut to the head, a wound which would cause him to suffer convulsions for the rest of his life from the brain damage. When American reinforcements arrived they found the unconscious Lukes had suffered 18 bayonet wounds in the fighting.   

JOHN ANDREWS

Navy Rank: Ordinary Seaman

Citation: On board the USS Benicia in action against Korean forts on 9 and 10 June 1871. Stationed at the lead in passing the forts, Andrews stood on the gunwale on the Benicia’s launch, lashed to the ridgerope. He remained unflinchingly in this dangerous position and gave his soundings with coolness and accuracy under a heavy fire.

HUGH PURVIS

Marine Corps Rank: Private

Citation: On board the U.S.S. Alaska during the attack on and capture of the Korean forts, 11 June 1871. Braving the enemy fire, Purvis was the first to scale the walls of the fort and capture the flag of the Korean forces

JOHN COLEMAN

Marine Corps Rank: Private

Citation: On board the U.S.S. Colorado in action at Korea on 11 June 1871. Fighting hand-to-hand with the enemy, Coleman succeeded in saving the life of Alexander McKenzie. Coleman retired from the Navy in 1893.

JAMES DOUGHERTY

Marine Corps Rank: Private

Citation: On board the USS Benicia, attack on and the capture of the Korean Forts June 11, 1871, for seeking out and killing the commanding officer of the Korean Forces.

CYRUS HAYDEN

Navy Rank: Carpenter

Citation: On board the USS Colorado during the attack and capture of the Korean forts, 11 June 1871. Serving as color bearer of the battalion, Hayden planted his flag on the ramparts of the citadel and protected it under a heavy fire from the enemy.

FREDERICK FRANKLIN

Navy Rank: Quartermaster

Citation: On board the U.S.S. Colorado during the attack and capture of the Korean forts on 11 June 1871. Assuming command of Company D, after Lt. McKee was wounded, Franklin handled the company with great credit until relieved.

MICHAEL MCNAMARA

Marine Corps Rank: Private

Citation: While serving on board the USS Benicia, for gallantry in advancing to the parapet, wrenching the match-lock from the hands of an enemy and killing him, at the capture of the Korean Forts, June 11, 1871.

PATRICK H GRACE

Navy Rank: Chief Quartermaster

Citation: On board the U.S.S. Benicia during the attack on the Korean forts, 10 and 11 June 1871. Carrying out his duties with coolness, Grace set forth gallant and meritorious conduct throughout this action.

JAMES F MERTON

Navy Rank: Landsman

Citation: Landsman and member of Company D during the capture of the Korean forts, 9 and 10 June 1871, Merton was severely wounded in the arm while trying to force his way into the fort.

MICHAEL OWENS

Marine Corps Rank: Private

Citation: On board the U.S.S. Colorado during the capture of Korean forts, 11 June 1871. Fighting courageously in hand-to-hand combat, Owens was badly wounded by the enemy during this action

SAMUEL F ROGERS

Navy Rank: Quartermaster

Citation: On board the U.S.S. Colorado during the attack and capture of the Korean forts, 11 June 1871. Fighting courageously at the side of Lt. McKee during this action, Rogers was wounded by the enemy.

ALEXANDER MCKENZIE

Navy Rank: Boatswain’s Mate

Citation: On board the U.S.S. Colorado during the capture of the Korean forts, June 11, 1871. Fighting at the side of Lt. McKee during this action.

WILLIAM TROY

Navy Rank: Ordinary Seaman

Citation: On board the U.S.S. Colorado during the capture of the Korean forts, 11 June 1871. Fighting at the side of Lt. McKee, by whom he was especially commended, Troy was badly wounded by the enemy.

CHARLES BROWN

Marine Corps Rank: Corporal

Citation: On board the USS Colorado in action against a Korean fort on 11 June 1871. Assisted in capturing the Korean standard in the center of the Citadel of the Korean Fort, June 11, 1871. *** The roguish Brown deserted before he could be awarded the Medal of Honor in person.

FOR THE TOP FOUR FORGOTTEN WARS IN AMERICA’S HISTORY CLICK HERE:   https://glitternight.com/2013/05/21/the-top-four-forgotten-conflicts-in-american-history-2/

FOR THE TOP 14 U.S. NAVAL BATTLES OF WORLD WAR ONE:  https://glitternight.com/2013/05/25/the-top-forgotten-u-s-naval-battles-of-world-war-one/ 

© Edward Wozniak and Balladeer’s Blog 2017. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Edward Wozniak and Balladeer’s Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content. 

  

 

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