MWINDO: EPIC MYTH OF AFRICA PART FIFTEEN

Balladeer’s Blog continues its examination of this epic myth of the Nyanga people.

PART FIFTEEN

Nyanga territoryThe semidivine hero Mwindo at last stood face to face with his evil father Shemwindo. After the villain had led his heroic son on a long chase through the various realms of the gods that honeycombed the subterranean region Mwindo finally had satisfaction.

There in the hut of the Nyanga creator deity Ongo the two adversaries eyed each other with the intense hostility born from prolonged conflict. Mwindo had bested Ongo at the Nyanga gambling game called Wiki and – as good as his word – the creator god had turned Shemwindo over to the victor.    

Mwindo, already showing signs of emerging maturity, maintained his composure in front of the powerful Ongo and the eternal children who inhabited the creator deity’s realm called Sheburungu. Controlling his anger he curtly chastised Shemwindo for his villainy and his cowardice.

Then he took custody of his father from Ongo’s man-sized birds who had seized Shemwindo before he could flee to the home of Nyamurairi the fire god and supreme deity of the Nyanga pantheon. Mwindo stretched his magic rope and used it to bind Shemwindo. To further humiliate the defeated former Chief the semidivine hero slung him across one shoulder, carrying him like a child.  

Next Mwindo benevolently gave back to Ongo everything he had won from him during their long Wiki game. He and the creator god parted on good terms and, carrying Shemwindo over his shoulder, the hero began his return journey to the surface world where his father would face justice. 

Mwindo reached the underground realm of the aardvark god Ntumba, which was still in ruins. The hero reconciled with Ntumba and, despite singing a boastful song-spell about how he had defeated the aardvark god in personal combat, he used his power to restore Ntumba’s kingdom to normal. The two parted on friendly terms.

Next Mwindo reached the land of the dead ruled over by the god Muisa. Kahindo, the goddess of good fortune and the daughter of the death-god, pleaded with Mwindo to heal her father. The devious god of the dead was still in the physically mangled condition our hero had left him in after his repeated deceptions had enabled Shemwindo to escape to Ntumba’s realm. 

Mwindo obliged, singing a song-spell that restored Muisa to his former good health. Next he subjected the death-god to a taunting song about how he had defeated him. (If you’re wondering Ongo was not taunted by Mwindo because of his immense power and because Mwindo had not bested Ongo in combat as he had Ntumba and Muisa.)

As Mwindo prepared to leave Muisa begged him to marry his daughter Kahindo, whom Mwindo had cured of yaws. The semidivine figure courteously declined the offer. With Shemwindo still slung across one shoulder Mwindo began the long climb back to the village of Tubondo on the surface world. 

At last Mwindo and his captive lifted up the flap of kikoka ferns through which they had descended to the land of the dead days earlier. Mwindo’s Aunt Iyangura was there in the ruins of Tubondo village to greet him and to return the other half of his magic rope to him; the life token that kept her aware that Mwindo was still alive.

The bat army of Mwindo’s uncle, the bat god Yana, was still in Tubondo and the bats also welcomed the hero on his return. Mwindo tossed the bound Shemwindo onto the ground and proceeded to sing a song-spell that repaired all the damage to Tubondo and resurrected all of the dead inhabitants. The hero then boasted to the revived citizens about all his adventures in the subterranean lands of the gods.  

Mwindo bade everyone in Tubondo to rest for the night and he would deal with their defeated Chief Shemwindo in the morning. The bat army guarded the bound villain overnight to ensure he would not escape again.

Come morning Mwindo emerged from his father’s former hut to the cheers of the citizens and amid much pomp seated himself upon a throne made of spears as was the custom when deciding on the fate of captives taken in wartime. Shemwindo was brought before Mwindo to face his punishment. +++

I WILL EXAMINE ADDITIONAL PARTS SOON. CHECK BACK ONCE OR TWICE A WEEK FOR UPDATES. 

FOR PART ONE CLICK HERE: PART ONE OF MWINDO

FOR ANOTHER EPIC MYTH CLICK HERE:  https://glitternight.com/2013/03/17/iroquois-epic-myth-hodadeion/

FOR SIMILAR ARTICLES AND MORE OF THE TOP LISTS FROM  BALLADEER’S BLOG CLICK HERE: https://glitternight.com/top-lists/

© Edward Wozniak and Balladeer’s Blog 2015. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Edward Wozniak and Balladeer’s Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content. 

20 Comments

Filed under Mythology

20 responses to “MWINDO: EPIC MYTH OF AFRICA PART FIFTEEN

  1. Awesome fights in the other parts but this was kind of a clip show.

  2. Nice to have somebdoy besides Hercules and Thor get attention.

  3. That’s a lot of gods to piss off!

  4. Asking questions are genuinely pleasant thing if you are not understanding anything fully, except this piece of writing gives fastidious understanding even.

  5. Wow, awesome blog layout! How long have you been blogging for?
    you made blogging look easy. The overall look of
    your web site is excellent, let alone the content!

  6. Howdy! Quick question that’s totally off topic. Do you know how to make your site mobile friendly?

    My web site looks weird when viewing from my iphone 4. I’m trying to find a template
    or plugin that might be able to fix this problem. If you have any recommendations,
    please share. Cheers!

  7. Excellent! I never heard about this myth before.

  8. WOW what an awesome myth!

  9. Shirley

    Why don’t filmmakers do this story?

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