MWINDO: EPIC MYTH OF AFRICA PART THIRTEEN

Balladeer’s Blog continues its examination of this epic myth of the Nyanga people.

PART THIRTEEN

cavernMwindo, the semidivine hero, stood at the entranceway to Munundu, the subterranean realm of the aardvark god Ntumba. (Munundu was also used as an epithet for Ntumba himself.) Mwindo had spotted his evil father Shemwindo hiding inside Munundu and talking with Ntumba himself.

The hero sang a song about all the evil Shemwindo had committed and demanded that Ntumba send him out or he would destroy his entire kingdom and defeat him as he had defeated Muisa the god of the dead. Inside Munundu the aardvark god told Shemwindo how annoyed he was at the trouble he had caused by seeking refuge in his kingdom. Still, he directed him to a rear cavern through which he could escape if Mwindo carried out his threats. 

As soon as it became apparent that Ntumba was not going to send Shemwindo out to him Mwindo once again called upon his new ally the lightning god Nkuba. That easily angered deity was more than happy to unleash his deadly lightning bolts on behalf of his new friend. At Mwindo’s request Nkuba rained down seven of his most potent bolts on the cavernous realm of the aardvark god.   

In the aftermath of Nkuba’s onslaught the kingdom of Munundu was in ruins. Ntumba stood amid the wreckage and angrily confronted Mwindo who had entered Munundu uninvited. Ntumba prepared to battle the semidivine hero by elongating his nose to resemble the creatures he was the lord of and by projecting the claws of an aardvark as well. 

Crying out how he would punish Mwindo for causing such destruction in his subterranean realm Ntumba attacked our hero. Emboldened by his recent triumph over the death-god Muisa, Mwindo fought back against Ntumba, matching the deity’s massive strength with his own.

Mwindo endured the pain of Ntumba’s claws slashing his flesh and his teeth at the end of his long snout gnawing at him wherever possible. The semidivine hero employed his song-spells, his axe and his conga-scepter (a riding-crop sized staff made of antelope tail) to counterattack.

In the end Mwindo defeated Ntumba and left him lying in a heap amid the ruins of his kingdom. Our hero threatened to use his song-spells to make the deity suffer from scrotal elephantiasis (I’m not joking) and to cause the aardvark god to be forever unable to find food. If Ntumba wanted to avoid such awful fates he had to tell Mwindo where Shemwindo had fled to.

Ntumba, anxious to get rid of the figure who had brought so much carnage his way, informed Mwindo that Shemwindo had fled through the rear cavern entrance. That passageway would lead Mwindo’s evil father to Sheburungu, the subterranean realm of Ongo, the creator god of the Nyanga pantheon.

(The reader may remember that many of the Nyanga deities rule individual underground kingdoms laid out like an ant colony. Another point I want to make is that Sheburungu is sometimes used as an epithet for Ongo the same way that Munundu was sometimes used as an epithet for its ruler Ntumba.)

Mwindo headed off in pursuit of his evil father Shemwindo, accompanied by the taunts of Ntumba, who was shouting out that Ongo was a deity far too powerful for Mwindo to overcome. The aardvark god spitefully stated that he hoped Mwindo would face his own defeat and destruction in Sheburungu. +++

I WILL EXAMINE ADDITIONAL PARTS SOON. CHECK BACK ONCE OR TWICE A WEEK FOR UPDATES. 

FOR PART ONE CLICK HERE: PART ONE OF MWINDO

FOR ANOTHER EPIC MYTH CLICK HERE:  https://glitternight.com/2013/03/17/iroquois-epic-myth-hodadeion/

FOR SIMILAR ARTICLES AND MORE OF THE TOP LISTS FROM  BALLADEER’S BLOG CLICK HERE: https://glitternight.com/top-lists/

© Edward Wozniak and Balladeer’s Blog 2015. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Edward Wozniak and Balladeer’s Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content. 

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