IROQUOIS EPIC MYTH: HODADEION PART SEVEN

Iroquois Confederation

Iroquois Confederation

Continuing the adventures of the Iroquois god of magic, Hodadeion.

PART 7 – THE TWIN HERONS – Hodadeion moved swiftly through the forest. He wanted to put as much space between himself and the giant horned serpents as possible before they grew hungry again. He continued heading north and at length came upon a pathway guarded by two enormous white herons. Each bird was bigger than a horse and at the sight of the demigod they attacked him, trying to claw and peck at him while simultaneously battering him with their powerful wings.

Hodadeion fled as quickly as he could back the way he had come until the twin herons halted their pursuit. The presence of the two horned serpents just ahead had no doubt taught the giant birds to stay well clear of this part of the forest. Since the herons seemed to be trying to eat him the demi-god Hodadeion reasoned that he would use a similar strategy with these new monstrous foes. He began picking as many wild beans as he could and stuffed them in his pouch of magical implements. When the pouch was full Hodadeion retraced his steps back to the lair of the gigantic herons.

This time when the twin creatures attacked him Hodadeion reached into his pouch and tossed a handful of beans in the air. The ravenous white herons gobbled them all up immediately, following which the god of magic repeated the procedure. Chanting and singing all the while to magically conjure up more and more beans, creating dozens for every lone bean in his pouch, until at long last his two avian attackers were glutted and could eat no more.

Their hunger satisfied the gigantic herons began tweeting and singing until, before the astonished Hodadeion they turned into two beautiful human maidens. The twins drew closer to the demigod and began thanking him for filling their bellies so thoroughly. Charmed by the two women Hodadeion sat on a nearby log with him, engaging them in conversation. After a while they began stroking his hair and slowly lowering his head into their laps. With a vague feeling of alarm Hodadeion realized he was being enchanted to sleep. Too drowsy to react further he hazily noted that the twins were picking lice from his hair and eating them, then everything went black.

Hodadeion woke up to the sound of roaring, unaware of how long he had been unconscious. Like in a dream he remembered the lovely twins turning back into giant herons and flying through the air with him, carrying him in a large, long basket. Groggily, he realized he was still lying in that basket but when he made to climb out of it he froze with trepidation. The roaring noise was the sound of water rushing by him. The heron-maidens had left him stranded on a small rock near the top of the enormous falls later to be called Niagara.

PART 8 COMING SOON.  FOR PART ONE CLICK HERE: https://glitternight.com/2013/03/17/iroquois-epic-myth-hodadeion/

For my original list of Iroquois deities click here: https://glitternight.com/2013/01/28/the-top-fifteen-deities-in-iroquois-mythology/

© Edward Wozniak and Balladeer’s Blog 2013. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Edward Wozniak and Balladeer’s Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content. 

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16 Comments

Filed under Mythology

16 responses to “IROQUOIS EPIC MYTH: HODADEION PART SEVEN

  1. These native American myths get better and better!

  2. Can’t wait for the next part!

  3. I am so grateful for this post and thanks such a good deal for sharing it with us.

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  8. Pingback: IROQUOIS EPIC MYTH: HODADEION | Balladeer's Blog

  9. What a treasure-trove of myths and gods!

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