NAVAJO MYTHS: VISIONS OF THE SPIDER GODDESS

 Part 3 of the encore of my look at the neglected Navajo epic myth about their war god taking on the evil gods called the Anaye. My readership was much smaller back in 2010 when I first ran it, so it will seem like new to most of you –

3. VISIONS OF THE SPIDER GODDESS – On their way west toward their father Tsohanoai’s house, Nayanazgeni and Tobadzistsini passed the Grand Canyon, which in Navajo mythology was the Place Of Emergence through which the Navajo people entered this world after escaping the previous one. (Navajo emergence myths and their stories of the previous worlds are too lengthy to get into right now) Reaching a stretch of desert, they soon noticed puffs of smoke emerging from the ground.

On closer inspection they realized they had come across the underground lair of Naste Estsan, the spider goddess, who lived underground in similar fashion to a trap-door spider. She welcomed the Heroic Twins in and assumed her form as an elderly woman. In addition to feeding them she informed them she knew all about their plans to rid the world of the menace of the Anaye. She revealed to them that she herself was the mother of the chief Anaye, Yeitso, with their own father Tsohanoai as the father. (In some versions she goes on to tell them that Yeitso then joined with her over and over to spawn the rest of the Anaye.)

She also related to them about her visions of the perils they would face on their quest to reach their father’s house. (Since those perils are covered in my next paragraph I won’t bother detailing them here) As a final gift to the two young  gods she gave them each two eagle feathers to wear in their head-bands: one to make them virtually invulnerable and another that would lull opponents into meek submission. Nayanazgeni and Tobadzistsini then resumed their journey.

As the Heroic Twins continued their westward journey they did indeed encounter every menace the spider goddess’ visions had warned them about. First they had to travel across a miles-long desert of boiling quicksand. Since Nayanazgeni and Tobadzistsini were wearing the protective feathers from Naste Estsan in their headbands they were able to endure the pain of this quicksand as they slowly and laboriously made their way through this desert. Even when they had sunk down so far into the quicksand that it rose several feet over their heads they still persevered, plodding onward to the west.
 
Next they had to fight their way through a densely packed forest of living cacti. These cacti, though rooted to the ground, were able to claw and grab at the Heroic Twins as they fought their way through mile after mile of this deadly forest. Again, the feathers worn in their headbands helped the two young gods endure their ordeal.
 
After at last leaving the forest of living cacti behind them Nayanazgeni and Tobadzistsini had to make their way through a rock canyon that would contract and crush travelers once they were deep within it. Their own strength and fortitude plus the charmed feathers from the spider goddess enabled the Heroic Twins to avoid being crushed by the closing sides of the canyon by keeping the walls at arm’s length and as they eventually groped their way free, the canyon walls slammed shut behind them before slowly beginning to reopen, in hopes of crushing the next wayfarer who tried to traverse the canyon.
 
CONTINUED NEXT TIME AS THE SUN GOD SUBJECTS OUR HEROES TO ORDEALS TO PROVE THEIR HIS SONS. MEANWHILE FOR THE WHOLE STORY IN ITS ENTIRETY AND FOR MORE INFO ON THE OTHER NAVAJO DEITIES MENTIONED IN THIS EPIC MYTH CLICK HERE: https://glitternight.com/navajo-myth-clear/
 

© Edward Wozniak and Balladeer’s Blog, 2010, 2011 and 2012. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Edward Wozniak and Balladeer’s Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

28 Comments

Filed under Mythology

28 responses to “NAVAJO MYTHS: VISIONS OF THE SPIDER GODDESS

  1. Pingback: Daniela

  2. Woman

    I wonder what would happen if I put a toy in my headband???

    Brilliant work as always Balladeer darling!!! Have you ever thought of re-posting the first parts?

  3. Incredible blog here! I am into goddess lore and as i roam around your blog I’m finding more and more that I never heard of! Wonderul!

  4. Pingback: Jessica

  5. Tom McFerran

    I have just finished reading the book, “Two Spirits” and I have to say that I don’t think I’ve read anything that has moved me so much for many years, that was the first time I’d heard of Changing Woman. I myself fell deeply in love with Hasbaa’, one of The Changing Ones, a treasure indeed.

    THe mountains, I become part of it.
    The herbs, the fir tree, I become part of it.
    The moening mists, the clouds, the gathering waters,
    I become part of it.
    The wilderness, the dew drops, the pollen,
    I am part of of it.

    Tom McFerran.

  6. Pingback: regenerative leadership institute

  7. Pingback: best electronic cigarette reviews

  8. Pingback: premium garcinia cambogia

  9. Pingback: here

  10. Pingback: jordan heels

  11. Pingback: canada goose outlet sale

  12. Pingback: guess outlet

  13. Pingback: cheap nfl jerseys

  14. Township Assembly Established For Monday, In spite of Highway Excursion Decrease Pottsgrove commissioners canceled their final public session on April 19. They don’t seem to be possible to skip two inside of a row, even though the board president is on an “international tour.”

  15. Etta

    Loved these gods!

  16. Leif

    Totally head tripping myth here dude.

  17. I love this Spidergoddess stuff!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s