NAVAJO MYTHS: WHEN A GOD DIES …

Here’s an encore of my look at the neglected Navajo epic myth about their war god taking on the evil gods called the Anaye. My readership was much smaller back in 2010 when I first ran it, so it will seem like new to most of you –

PART 2 – WHEN A GOD DIES … In those ancient times Nayanazgeni (“Alien God Killer”)and his brother Tobadzistsini (“Child of the Water”)were living with their mother, the goddess Estsanatlehi, on a plateau near their worshippers, the Navajo people of the time. They were aware of the alien gods called the Anaye who were preying on the world at large.
 
One such Anaye was a club-wielding giant who rode an equally huge cougar. The giant had a double-face, one in front and one in the rear so it could not be snuck up on. This Anaye had begun to prey on the inhabitants of the village the three deities lived near. He would ride forth each day astride his giant cougar and catch a villager to devour. (Some versions say it would be two villagers – one for him to eat and one as a meal for his giant cougar. Still others say it was just a giant cougar with no one riding it.)
 
The war god Nayanazgeni sought to protect the Navajo and tracked the Anaye to his cavern lair in the hills where he attacked him. After a long, savage struggle Nayanazgeni eventually beat him to death with his own enormous club. He then transformed the slain Anaye and his mount into all the world’s cougars since a god could not be killed unless its divine essence was transformed into something else. (This concept figures heavily in the tale to come)
 
The war god and his brother decided to rid the world of all of the Anaye to free humans from their reign of terror. Estsanatlehi (in some versions both she and her sister Yolkaiestsan) advised the Heroic Twins that in order to defeat the Anaye and their chief, Yeitso, they would need special weapons such as only their father, the sun god Tsohanoai, could provide. Nayanazgeni and Tobadzistsini then set out on a danger-filled journey to the far west House Of The Sun God, where their father retired at the end of each day’s journey across the sky.
 
CONTINUED NEXT TIME WITH THE PERILOUS JOURNEY TO THE HOUSE OF THE SUN GOD. MEANWHILE FOR THE WHOLE STORY IN ITS ENTIRETY AND FOR MORE INFO ON THE OTHER NAVAJO DEITIES MENTIONED IN THIS EPIC MYTH CLICK HERE: https://glitternight.com/navajo-myth-clear/
 

© Edward Wozniak and Balladeer’s Blog, 2010, 2011 and 2012. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Edward Wozniak and Balladeer’s Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

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26 Comments

Filed under Mythology

26 responses to “NAVAJO MYTHS: WHEN A GOD DIES …

  1. Can’t believe I missed this on ur blog in the past. Wonderful story! u make these myths come alive!

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  4. You are like the Tolkien of lost mythology!

  5. Very nice way of giving the story popular appeal!

  6. nu

    Fantastic article. This god’s adventure is very appealing.

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  8. I would like to thank you for the efforts you have put in writing this web site. I’m hoping the same high-grade blog post from you in the upcoming also. Actually your creative writing abilities has encouraged me to get my own site now. Really the blogging is spreading its wings rapidly. Your write up is a good example of it.

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  10. I thought this opening chapter was weaker than what you did with the rest of this story.

  11. I really can’t believe how great this site is. Keep up the good work. I’m going to tell all my friends about this place.

  12. This site looks better and better every time I visit it. What have you done with this place to make it so amazing?!

  13. Lacey

    It’s nearly impossible to find detailed interpretations of these Navajo stories. Thank you!

  14. Duane

    Good web site! I love these myths.

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