MEDAL OF HONOR RECIPIENTS FROM THE BOXER “REBELLION” EXPEDITION

titusHAVE A RESPECT-FUL MEMORIAL DAY! Balladeer’s Blog once again takes a look at a currently neglected conflict and some of the military personnel who served in it. Last year I examined the American troops who served on Russian soil from 1918-1920, this year I look at some of the Congressional Medal of Honor recipients from the Relief Expedition during the Boxer Massacres in China (1900).

corporal titusCALVIN P. TITUS

Branch of Service: Army

Rank: Standard Bearer/ Musician

Citation: “For gallant and daring conduct in the presence of his colonel and other officers and enlisted men of his regiment on 14 August 1900, while serving with Company E, 14th Infantry, at Peking, China. Musician Titus was first to scale the wall of the city.” He raised the American Flag from the top of that wall. (Pictured above.) NOTE: Titus previously served in the Philippine War (1899-1902) and subsequently in the Mexican Expedition (1916-1917) and Occupied Germany after World War One. 

Peter StewartPETER STEWART

Branch of Service: Marine Corps

Rank: Gunnery Sergeant

Citation: “For extraordinary heroism while serving with the Marine Guard, Captain Newt Hall’s Marine Detachment, 1st Regiment (Marines), U.S.S. Newark in action with the relief expedition of the Allied forces in China during the battles of 13, 20, 21, and 22 June 1900. Throughout this period and in the presence of the enemy, Stewart distinguished himself by meritorious conduct.”  

ROBERT H. VON SCHLICK

Branch of Service: Army

Rank: Private

Citation: “For gallantry in action on 13 July 1900, while serving with Company C, 9th Infantry, at Tientsin, China. Although previously wounded while carrying a wounded comrade to a place of safety, Private Von Schlick rejoined his command, which partly occupied an exposed position upon a dike, remaining there after his command had been withdrawn, singly keeping up the fire, and obliviously presenting himself as a conspicuous target until he was literally shot off his position by the enemy.”

OSCAR J. UPHAM

Branch of Service: Marine Corps

Rank: Private

Citation: “For extraordinary heroism in action in the presence of the enemy at Peking, China, 21 July to 17 August 1900. Although under a heavy fire from the enemy during this period, Private Upham assisted in the erection of barricades.” NOTE: Upham had also served in the Spanish-American War.

William SeachWILLIAM SEACH

Branch of Service: Navy

Rank: Ordinary Seaman

Citation: “For extraordinary heroism in action with the relief expedition of the Allied forces in China during the battles of 13, 20, 21 and 22 June 1900, while serving with a detachment from the U.S.S. Newark. On 13 June Ordinary Seaman Seach and six others were cited for their courage in repulsing an attack by 300 Chinese Imperialist soldiers and Boxer militants with a bayonet charge, thus thwarting a planned massive attack on the entire force.

               On 20 June during a day-long battle, Seach ran across an open clearing, gained cover, and cleaned out nests of Chinese snipers. On 21 June during a surprise saber attack by Chinese cavalrymen, Seach was cited for defending gun emplacements. On 22 June Seach and others breached the wall of a Chinese fort, fought their way to the enemy’s guns, and turned the cannon upon the defenders of the fort.”

KARL THOMAS

Branch of Service: Navy

Rank: Coxswain

Citation: “For extraordinary heroism in action while serving with the detachment from the U.S.S. Newark, fighting with the relief expedition of the Allied forces in China 13, 20, 21, and 22 June 1900. During this period and in the presence of the enemy, Coxswain Thomas distinguished himself by meritorious conduct.”

Clarence Sutton tombstoneCLARENCE E. SUTTON

Branch of Service: Marine Corps

Rank: 1st Sergeant

Citation: “For extraordinary heroism while serving with the Headquarters, 1st Regiment (Marines), in action during the battle near Tientsin, China, 13 July 1900. Although under heavy fire from the enemy, Sergeant Sutton assisted in carrying a wounded officer from the field of battle.” That “wounded officer” was THE Marine Corps Lieutenant Smedley D. Butler.  NOTE: Sutton had previously served in the Philippine War.

ROBERT H. STANLEY

Branch of Service: Navy

Rank: Hospital Apprentice

Citation: “For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty while serving in the presence of the enemy in volunteering and carrying messages under fire at Peking, China on 12 July 1900. Hospital Apprentice Stanley’s exceptional fortitude, inspiring initiative, and unrelenting devotion to duty reflected great credit upon himself and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.” NOTE: Stanley previously served in the Spanish-American War & the Philippine War and subsequently in World War One.

mccloyJOHN MCCLOY

Branch of Service: Navy

Rank: Coxswain

Citation: “For extraordinary heroism in action while serving with the detachment from the U.S.S. Newark, fighting with the relief expedition of the Allied forces in China, 13, 20, 21, and 22 June 1900. During this period and in the presence of the enemy, Coxswain McCloy distinguished himself by meritorious conduct.”  NOTE: McCloy was one of the rare men to earn TWO Medals of Honor, the 2nd one for his service in Vera Cruz in 1914.

GEORGE ROSE

Branch of Service: Navy

Rank: Seaman

Citation: “For extraordinary heroism in action in the presence of the enemy during the battles at Peking, China, 13, 20, 21 and 22 June 1900. Throughout this period, Seaman Rose distinguished himself by meritorious conduct. While stationed as a crewmember of the U.S.S. Newark, he was part of its landing force that went ashore off Taku, China. On 31 May 1900, he was in a party of six under John McCloy (MH) which took ammunition from the Newark to Tientsin. On 10 June 1900, he was one of a party that carried dispatches from LaFa to Yongstsum at night.

              On the 13th he was one of a few who fought off a large force of the enemy saving the Main baggage train from destruction. On the 20th and 21st he was engaged in heavy fighting against the Imperial Army being always in the first rank. On the 22d he showed gallantry in the capture of the Siku Arsenal. He volunteered to go to the nearby village which was occupied by the enemy to secure medical supplies urgently required. The party brought back the supplies carried by newly taken prisoners.”  NOTE: Rose later served in World War One.

William HortonWILLIAM C. HORTON

Branch of Service: Marine Corps

Rank: Private

Citation: “For extraordinary heroism in action against the enemy at Peking, China, 21 July to 17 August 1900. Although under heavy fire from the enemy, Private Horton assisted in the erection of barricades.”

SAMUEL MCALLISTER

Branch of Service: Navy

Rank: Ordinary Seaman

Citation: “For extraordinary heroism in action against the enemy at Tientsin, China, 20 June 1900, while serving with the detachment from the U.S.S. Newark. Crossing the river in a small boat while under heavy enemy fire, Ordinary Seaman McAllister assisted in destroying buildings occupied by the enemy.” 

Louis LawtonLOUIS B. LAWTON

Branch of Service: Army

Rank: 1st Lieutenant

Citation: “For gallantry in action on 13 July 1900, while serving with the 9th Infantry at Tientsin, China. First Lieutenant Lawton carried a message and guided reinforcements across a wide and fireswept space, during which he was thrice wounded.”

HENRY W. HEISCH

Branch of Service: Marine Corps

Rank: Private

Citation: “For extraordinary heroism in action against the enemy at Tientsin, China, 20 June 1900. Crossing the river in a small boat while under heavy fire, Private Heisch assisted in destroying buildings occupied by the enemy.”

Andre BrewsterANDRE W. BREWSTER

Branch of Service: Army

Rank: Captain

Citation: “For gallantry in action on 13 July 1900, while serving with the 9th Infantry at Tientsin, China. While under fire Captain Brewster rescued two of his men from drowning.”  NOTE: Brewster had previously served in the Spanish-American War.

FRANKLIN J PHILLIPS (“Harry Fisher”) 

Branch of Service: Marine Corps

Rank: Private

Citation: “For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty from 20 June 1900 to 16 July 1900. Private Phillips served in the presence of the enemy at the Battle of Peking, China. Assisting in the erection of barricades during the action, he was killed by the heavy enemy fire. By his courageous actions, indomitable spirit, and complete dedication to duty, Private Phillips reflected great credit upon himself and upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country.” 

NOTE: Phillips had previously served in the Army during the Spanish-American War and was deployed with his unit in Cuba. On December 17th, 1898, seven days after the Treaty of Paris ended the war, Phillips deserted while suffering from Malaria. Dishonorably discharged, he reenlisted – this time in the Marine Corps – under the alias Harry Fisher. In 1988, per appeals from Congress and Phillips’ family, the record was revised and his Medal of Honor laurels referred to him as Franklin J. Phillips instead of his alias.

FOR ELEVEN MEDAL OF HONOR RECIPIENTS FROM WORLD WAR ONE CLICK HERE.

13 Comments

Filed under Neglected History

13 responses to “MEDAL OF HONOR RECIPIENTS FROM THE BOXER “REBELLION” EXPEDITION

  1. GP

    I think it might be better to say “Remember” or “Have a respectable Memorial Day”

    (Just a suggestion)

  2. Wonderful article on so many great people! They all are excellent 🌹well shared 💗

  3. Hey there this is kinda of off topic but I was wanting to know if blogs use WYSIWYG editors or if you have to manually code with HTML. I’m starting a blog soon but have no coding expertise so I wanted to get guidance from someone with experience. Any help would be enormously appreciated!

  4. Good site you’ve got here.. It’s hard to find quality writing like yours these days. I truly appreciate people like you! Take care!!

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