ANCIENT SCI-FI: FARMING IN THE YEAR 2000 A.D. (1890)

Overland MonthlyFARMING IN THE YEAR 2000 A.D. (1890) – Written by Edward Berwick. Just when you thought it was safe to read speculative science fiction about life in the future without Edward Bellamy’s Looking Backward being referenced, along comes this entry from the Overland Monthly‘s Twentieth Century special.

Where Bellamy focused on city living, this item details an idyllic future specifically from the agricultural angle. All of civilization has become vegetarian, so with no need for grazing land for cattle much more acreage is devoted to raising crops. High-tech machinery cares for and harvests the bounty.

Collected waste from the cities is used as fertilizer and enormous, sprawling greenhouses have been constructed to ensure all fruits and vegetables are available all year ’round. The science of weather prediction has grown so precise that advance measures can be taken to protect crops from previously fatal calamities.

Snobbery toward farming and farmers has become obsolete. The agricultural class are looked on as gentlemen farmers and they live in plush manors. Transportation between the widely separated farms is done via electric automobiles called curricles.

Looking BackwardThis tale, like most of the other Bellamy-esque sequels to Looking Backward uses Julian and Dr Leete from that work, fan fiction-style.

Pursuit of wealth is looked down on in this piece and is a major theme.

All in all, for one of the Bellamy imitations Farming in the Year 2000 A.D. is brief and to the point, with much less meandering and much fewer attempts to engage in an argument by argument rebuttal to his original story.       

6 Comments

Filed under Ancient Science Fiction

6 responses to “ANCIENT SCI-FI: FARMING IN THE YEAR 2000 A.D. (1890)

  1. GKAM44

    Such a fascinating novel! Good review!

  2. Craig

    Such an old book but some awesome stuff in it.

  3. Hal

    This was a great review! That book had some weird ideas but others were spot on!

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