REVOLUTIONARY WAR: FORGOTTEN NAVAL BATTLES

American navy -revolutionary warWelcome back to Balladeer’s Blog! As always I am big on seasonal articles and here is another one of my examinations of a neglected aspect of Revolutionary War history. With the 4th of July coming up quickly enjoy this look at some forgotten naval battles from the war for our country’s independence.

AUGUST 7th, 1775 – The Commerce raided the HMS Betsy and successfully made off with over 17,000 lbs of gunpowder for the rebel cause.

AUGUST 10th, 1775 – In Gloucester, MA the town militia fired on the HMS Falcon and drove it off, killing 35 British sailors and forcing the ship to abandon its efforts to capture two American schooners.

NOVEMBER 27th, 1775 – Captain John Manley and his ship the Lee captured the HMS Nancy off the coast of Boston and with it a fortune in military supplies for the Continental Army.

JANUARY 23rd, 1776 – 40 miles off the coast of Sandy Hook, NJ, an impromptu rebel force attacked and captured the HMS Blue Mountain Valley, raided its supplies and then burned it.

JANUARY 27th-28th, 1776 – The HMS Cruizer (sic) attempted to penetrate up the Cape Fear River in North Carolina but after incessant fire from the American forces on both sides of the river the ship was forced to withdraw.

MARCH 22nd, 1776 – The South Carolina Ship Comet defeated and captured the HMS General Clinton, a mammoth battleship.

APRIL 6th, 1776 – Captain Esek Hopkins’ command defeated and drove off the HMS Glasgow after a three hour long battle just off Block Island, RI.

APRIL 17th, 1776 – Captain John Barry and his ship the Lexington fought and captured the HMS Edward somewhere off the Virginia coast.

MAY 8th-9th, 1776 – On the Delaware River near Wilmington, DE a makeshift American force of thirteen galleys attacked two British ships. After a battle that lasted all night and into the following day the Americans forced the British ships to withdraw.

MAY 17th-19th, 1776 – The American ship the Franklin captured the HMS Hope along with its gunpowder and all the entrenching tools it was taking to the British Army. As the Franklin and its prize approached Nantasket Roads, MA thirteen small British ships with 200 men attacked. After a half hour battle which began with gunfire and ended with close-quarters battling with hooks and lances the British were forced to retreat. The Franklin’s Captain James Mugford was killed in this battle. 

AUGUST 7th, 1776 – Off the coast of New Hampshire the American Privateer ship the USS Hancock captured the HMS Reward along with all its cargo intact. That cargo included turtles being delivered to Lord North.

SEPTEMBER 6th, 1776 – Near Governor’s Island, NY Ezra Lee attempted the very first submarine attack in military history. In the underwater vessel American Turtle designed by David Bushnell Lee attempted to destroy the British ships ported in the area. The powder charges he unleashed from the American Turtle successfully exploded against the hulls of the ships but those copper hulls were too thick to be penetrated by the charges. The ships were tossed around badly like on a storm at sea but no permanent damage was done.

NOVEMBER 1st, 1776 – North Carolina’s Independent Company of Carteret County attacked and captured the foundered HMS Aurora, along with the entire crew and all supplies. This took place at Ocracoke Inlet, NC.

FOR PART TWO – https://glitternight.com/2013/07/03/part-two-of-forgotten-naval-battles-of-the-revolutionary-war/ 

FOR THE REVOLUTIONARY WAR ACTIVITIES OF ALL 59 SIGNERS OF THE DECLARATION OF INDEPENDNCE CLICK HERE: https://glitternight.com/2012/07/03/sacred-honor-quick-facts-about-the-signers-of-the-declaration-of-independence/

© Edward Wozniak and Balladeer’s Blog 2013. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Edward Wozniak and Balladeer’s Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.          

43 Comments

Filed under Neglected History, Revolutionary War

43 responses to “REVOLUTIONARY WAR: FORGOTTEN NAVAL BATTLES

  1. It’s good to keep people reminded of the great service of our military. Movies once were made about them, but now movies prefer to do cartoons, science fiction, or murders. Thanks for the interesting blog.

  2. I guess my comment was lost during the sign in so I’ll try again but if 2 comments show up, please x one of them.
    I think it’s very helpful to remind people of the great services of our military over many years. Giving one’s life or limb is not to be so quickly forgotten and discarded. We need to be grateful and respect our Service people.
    Thank you for doing that.

  3. The new fleet dropped down the Delaware River on 4 January 1776; but a cold snap froze the river and the bay, checking its progress at Reedy Island for some six weeks. A thaw released Hopkins’ warships from winter’s icy grasp in mid-February, and the fleet sortied on 18 February for its first operation. The Marine Committee had ordered Hopkins to sail for Hampton Roads to attack British warships which were harassing American shipping in Virginia waters; then to render similar service at Charleston, South Carolina ; and, finally, to head for Rhode Island waters. He was given the discretion of disregarding these orders if they proved impossible and planning an operation of his own.

  4. On 23 February 1805, while on the Halifax station, Leander discovered the French frigate Ville de Milan , under Captain Pierre Guillet, and the British Cleopatra , which the Ville de Milan had captured the day before. The engagement between Ville de Milan and Cleopatra had left both ships greatly damaged. Consequently, when they encountered Leander they struck to Leander without a fight. Leander came upon Cleopatra first, and as soon as she struck, the British prisoners on board her, i.e., her original crew, took possession of her. She then followed Leander towards Ville de Paris, which too struck.

  5. Franklin K. Cole

    HMS RANGER The ship in which Bligh served as a midshipman (at first he was officially entered as an able-bodied seaman) from September 2, 1774, to March 17, 1776.

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  8. I enjoy how u find parts of the revolutionary war that other places dont cover

  9. I can’t belive u yanks ever beat us on the sea

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  12. Kenneth Anger Fan

    These are rare items in that war.

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  18. Tamala

    I like these kinds of things more than big battles with a bunch of gunsmoke and running around.

  19. Dion

    This is so much more interesting than the same five battles covered over and over again.

  20. Tiffani

    These are fascinating little fights!

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